eHarmony Pays Attention

Over the holidays, eHarmony released apps for iOS and Android that give you access to their site. They chose an unfortunate tagline, though.

eHarmony mobile helps you find someone wonderful "in the palm of your hand"

Since I am a twelve-year-old boy at heart, I had to make a joke about the tagline on Twitter.

[blackbirdpie url=”http://twitter.com/Sargent/status/22339099524341760″]

To my surprise, eHarmony responded!

[blackbirdpie url=”http://twitter.com/eHarmony/statuses/22345334722142208″]

[blackbirdpie url=”http://twitter.com/Sargent/status/22348106943172608″]

[blackbirdpie url=”http://twitter.com/eHarmony/statuses/22349609292537856″]

I’m impressed that eHarmony was paying attention, responded, and is changing their tagline. Now only one question remains: what should I use my new-found Twitter power to do?

13 thoughts on “eHarmony Pays Attention

  1. I’ve learned the hard way that big companies really do monitor their brands on Twitter. I mentioned the high-pressure salesman techniques of a certain siding corporation and got a prompt response from them. I’ve also said some mean things about bands (particularly live shows) and gotten passive-aggressive thanks-for-the-criticism’s that made me feel pretty bad for saying them.

    Oh, man, this also reminds me of the time our friend Alex posted a pointed criticism of Scott Kurtz (of PvP) and he personally responded to his Livejournal entry. THAT was funny.

    It is really interesting, though, that after all the services and websites that have come and gone, Twitter is the one that finally made brands look out for themselves. Twitter? Really??

  2. I’ve had excellent luck tweeting about issues and getting a response from companies. Bad karma on Twitter seems to have improved customer service in ways I would have never imagined or expected. I think I’m about to use it to whip an Amazon seller into shape.

  3. Jim: ha, I’d forgotten about Scott vs Alex. I do think there’s a reason why Twitter’s spawned this kind of reaction when blogs and Facebook haven’t, but I want to think more about it before I spout off.

  4. In the past year I’ve racked up a few too many incidents of mouthing off about the NHL or an affiliated organization only to get a prompt response on Twitter (one of these days I’ll learn); however, it got me a phone call with their head of marketing, so really, you never know. There are things I dislike about Twitter, but the immediacy of it is wonderful.

  5. Perhaps this trend will convince tweeters to be more
    careful in their phrasing, and think twice before spewing venom
    into the blogosphere, realizing there’s a person at the other end
    who might be hurt by their choice of language–thus creating a
    kinder, gentler interwebs? Nah, who am I kidding?

  6. Perhaps this trend will convince tweeters to be more careful in their phrasing, and think twice before spewing venom into the blogosphere, realizing there’s a person at the other end who might be hurt by their choice of language–thus creating a kinder, gentler interwebs? Nah, who am I kidding?

    As with political soundbites, this is unlikely. Brevity is the soul of wit, but it often ends up filled with extreme language to drive home a point. John Kerry was right to lament the death of nuance. It irks me that modern Internet discussion regularly abuses superlatives.

  7. What Jim said. Also, ROFL. (Brevity, but not much wit.)

    I mentioned Jimmy Buffett and got an add from JimmyBuffettInfo. Would have been cooler if it had been Himself… This is why you (known in our house as “Physics Guy”) pull in the big bux.

    And I thought we were living in the post-post ironic age where saying stuff like that (e-harmony slogan) with a straight face was all the rage. Did we turn again? Someone hold my hand before I slip off again, ‘k?

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